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Antonine Baths

Antonine Baths

Antonine Baths

Antonine Baths (Amilcar, Carthage) — Located on the seaside at the north-eastern corner of ancient Carthage, the Antonine Baths today retain very little of their former splendor. Of the largest bath complex in the African provinces and the third largest bath complex in the Roman world, measuring about 35,000 sq. meters, only remnants of the substructures remain, yet these fragments hint at the enormity and vastness of the original structure. This inscription gives scholars a terminus post quem for the baths of 145 CE, when Antoninus Pius became emperor. It is also relatively safe to assume that the baths would have been finished during his reign, which would have been before his death in 161 CE. Names found on this site were Germanicus and Dacicus, which were given to Antoninus in 157 CE. Thus, the date of the dedication of the baths can be placed somewhere around 157-161 CE

The Antonine Baths were used up until the end of the Byzantine rule in 6th century CE, but by that time, they retained little of their former grandeur. After control of Carthage was retaken from the Vandals, the floor plan of the baths was severely reduced. Once the Arabs took Carthage from the Byzantine Empire, the Antonine Baths fell out of use and the main floor would later collapse. Admission: 10 Dt. Hours: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm daily (mid-September to mid-July) (7:00 pm from mid-July to mid-September).